Little-Known Uses for Paracord in Outdoor Survival

Paracord, short for parachute cord, can save your life if you need to leave a plane (note: only if there’s a parachute attached to it.)

But there’s a lot more to this uniquely-useful material than mere parachutes.

Paracord is actually one of the most important survival tools you can have at your disposal in outdoor emergency situations.

Keeping Food, Perishables, and Valuables Off the Ground

You’re in the wild and you have enough food to last you an entire week. That’s great news. The bad news: there are bears or raccoons sharing the wild with you, and they’re just as happy to eat your food as you are.

Keeping your food, perishables, and other valuables off the ground isn’t just a sure way to ensure their safety, but it will help stave off moisture and insects as well. Find a solid branch that can bear the weight of your supplies and then rig a simple paracord knot (in a bind, even a shoe-tie knot will suffice). Tie the paracord around your bag, cooler, or storage kit—don’t be afraid to tie it more than once to ensure security—and voila! You now have a method of keeping your food away from the animals. When you need to move, simply untie the paracord, pack it up again, and move along.

Rigging Tents and Tarps

In survival, shelter is a must-have. A tent or a tarp is a sure way to keep you and your supplies dry—but only if you can successfully rig it so that you don’t have to wear the tarp like a poncho. A paracord will function as a brilliant tarp-rigger at a moment’s notice.

You can start by learning the “hobo’s tent,” which is a makeshift tent using only paracord and a basic flat tarp. You only need basic tools for the job, such as a camp knife, and you’ll be able to construct your own shelter using essential supplies and, of course, your wits.

Setting Up Snare Traps

If you’re ever in a life-and-death survival situation, then securing a source of food is going to be one of your top priorities. You can hunt, sure, and you can gather berries (provided you know how to gather actual edible berries), but nothing is going to keep you going quite like trapping an animal. For that purpose, you can use a paracord snare trap. The trap is easy to learn and as low-budget as low-budget gets, yet it’s surprisingly effective.

Given that our Survival Straps are made from several feet of super-strong military spec paracord, there’s a lot of survival power that you can pack into one paracord bracelet. But it does take a bit of know-how to suddenly become the McGyver of Survival Straps. The good news? Once you acquire the know-how provided in this article, you’ll be ready to shelter yourself, feed yourself, and keep your most valuable items out of harm’s way. And when it comes to Survival Straps, that’s just the tip of the survival iceburg.

Different Ways to Use a Survival Bracelet

Paracord bracelets are quickly becoming a fashion trend. What was once used as a supplementary survival item by firefighters and servicemen, these bracelets are now a must have for outdoor adventurers. If you don’t own one, you might be wondering how a bracelet made of parachute cord could have gotten so popular. Here are ways you can make full use of a paracord bracelet in the wild:

Outdoor Weapon

If you are lost and food is not something you can access by swiping your credit card, unravel your bracelet to create a bow and arrow which you can use to hunt furry little creatures. By using a sharp knife and a flexible yet hardy twig, you can build your own bow. For arrows, gather many pieces of tree shoots and scavenge for bird feathers.

Set up Traps

If your aim is not that great, maybe your patience is. Another way to catch your breakfast in the wilderness is to set up a trap. Use a section of your bracelet for triggers and snare nooses. Furthermore, the inner strands of the strap can be used as the string of a Paiute Deadfall.

After the trap is set up, you can focus on other productive activities that will keep you alive while you wait.

Not Your Ideal Fishing Expedition

It may take a while before your trap catches something so in the meantime, use another part of the 550 cord for fishing. By attaching a sharp hook and bait into a strand of the bracelet, you just might have a chance of grilling seafood for dinner.

Bow-and-drill Friction Fire

As soon as the sun sets, getting a fire going is very important whether you have something for dinner or not. Aside from keeping you warm, fire can be the only thing standing between you and a starving predator.

Twist two strands of cord around each other to create your bowstring, and gather dry softwoods as your drill and board to get a fire roaring in no time.

Tourniquet

In the great outdoors, the elements increase your chance of obtaining an injury. In case of an open wound, use a section of your bracelet as a tourniquet and strap it on the wrist or leg of the injured person to control severe bleeding.

Shelter

If you do not want to spend the night sleeping on a tree branch, you can make use of your 550 cord to quickly set up a shelter. Gather branches and long leaves and lash them together using a part of your bracelet. Having 15-20 feet of cord will insure that you do not have to worry about the size of your humble abode. You can reclaim the cord when morning comes and you are ready to move on.

Summary

What was once used as a practical method to carry supplementary cord by soldiers and firefighters, paracord bracelets are now being used by countless outdoor adventurers. By using different parts of the strap to create improvised equipment for food, shelter, and emergency situations, a 550 cord can be the difference between life and death.

Survival Straps Mossy Oak Collection

Survival Straps® is fired up to launch the Mossy Oak® collection which is designed to fit the lifestyle of hunters and avid outdoorsmen. Each Survival Bracelet™ and Mossy Oak accessory including key fobs and necklaces are made with super strong 550 military issue paracord. In a pinch or an emergency situation, Survival Straps products can be unraveled and used as cordage for tying down a trophy buck to a 4-wheeler, storing gear from a tree branch, fixing a broken binocular strap or even as a tourniquet.

Mossy OakIf you do use it, send us your story, and we send you a new one for free. All Survival Straps® products are made in America and help to support our men and women in uniform. You can get them by visiting our website, here.

Survival Straps: Megan and Dan’s Wild Engagement

While we sure are glad that our gear can come in handy during emergency survival situations, we love hearing the lighter stories about where you take and use your Survival Straps gear. Megan recently emailed in a very happy and joyous occasion of which we were so thrilled to have played a small part. Megan wrote:

“My dad started taking me backpacking when I was 17, and I fell in love with it. Everything about being outdoors, pushing the limits of my comfort zones, accomplishing goals and literally getting over that mountain, made me happy. When I started dating Dan, he had never been backpacking, but wanted to try it, so we took him with us. He also fell in love with it and we have been going every year since we’ve been dating (5.5 years, this was our 5th trip together).

ProposalTwo years ago I purchased a Survival Strap for my dad, who loves it and wears it on all of his backpacking trips, as well as his call-outs for the Search and Rescue team he is on. Last year, I ordered Survival Straps for Dan and myself to take with us on the trail.

Proposal 1This year, Dan proposed to me on top of Precipice Lake in the Ansel Adams Wilderness (High Sierra Trail, Sierra/Kings Canyon National Park). It wasn’t your typical proposal. It was 10,600 feet of elevation, we were grimy from being out on the trail for 3 days already, we were hungry and tired, but it was perfect in every way. (I said yes, of course!) We still had twenty miles of trail to hike out of and I couldn’t wear my engagement ring, since I was afraid of losing/wrecking/making it filthy, I attached it to my Survival Strap, so I could at least see it sparkle in that beautiful sunlight.

Proposal 2Even when not unraveled, Survival Straps are extremely useful! Thanks to mine, I was able to enjoy my engagement ring while backpacking through the High Sierra’s. Thank you for such an amazing product.”

A HUGE congratulations to the happy couple! We are so excited to have been a part of your big day, and we wish you both many more years of happiness together. Thank you for sharing, Megan and Dan!

Do you have an interesting survival story to tell? Don’t forget to let us know! Email us at stories@survivalstraps.com.

Survival Straps in Outdoor Life

Survival Straps® is excited to have been featured in an article in Outdoor Life “The Survivalist” Blog. The article lists great tips and ideas on how to use paracord in emergency situations including building your own fire, setting traps, and even rigging your own bow and arrows. See the full article here!

Do you have unique tips or tricks on how to use your Survival Straps®? Share in the comments below, or email us your stories at stories@survivalstraps.com.

Survival Story: Saving the Day in a Snowy Situation

In light of the blizzards that have recently been circulating, we thought we would share a story of how Survival Straps saved the day in a snowy situation:

The climbCasey out of Jacksonville, Florida wrote:

My husband, Troy, and his co-worker/friend, Eric, are Supervisors for a Gold Mine in Alaska. Part of their job is to hike in to the wilderness to stake new claims and test new equipment. Back in April, they had to hike several miles, over mountain ridges and through the Alaskan Wilderness in an attempt to capture a cell signal to bounce back to camp. There was only one pair of modern snowshoes, so they took the antique pair off of the lodge wall for Eric to use. Several miles into their hike, the bottom of Eric’s snow shoes fell apart.

The fixTurning around and trying to trudge back through the 4-inch-plus deep snow without the shoes was NOT an option. Troy knew he had to do something, so he sacrificed his Survival Strap to use, along with branches from the trees, to fix the snow shoes. Because of the paracord, they were able to fashion a makeshift bottom to the shoe, continue their work and complete the hike back to camp!

Strap after

They workedHave any cool stories about how you use your Survival Strap? Don’t forget to let us know! Email us your story with pictures to stories@survivalstraps.com.

Don’t have a Survival Strap yet? Get yours here: www.survivalstraps.com

Survival Stories: Troy Curnow

Wear it. Unravel it. Survive it.

It’s always exciting to read Survival Stories and see pictures that our customers send in via email (stories@survialstraps.com) or in a good old-fashioned letter. Here’s a story we received yesterday of how our handy, 550 military spec paracord bracelet helped to save Troy Curnow’s hide while he was hiking in Alaska:

Survival Straps-Curnow's Climb

“I purchased a survival strap for my husband (the wilderness adventurer) while we were living in Colorado. We moved back to Jax, Fl last year, and come to find out you guys were based here all along! That’s besides the point, though, because my husband left in February to work on a Gold Mine in Alaska, and actually had to use his survival strap in a survival situation! Here’s his story:

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